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Canine Tutors, San Jose Dog Training A Labrador Puppy

Canine Tutors, San Jose Dog Training A Labrador Puppy

Hey what’s up everybody it’s Ashley Starling with Canine Tutors Dog Training and today we are working this young puppy on some basics, we are getting him up on the placeboard and teaching him the difference between “sit” and “down”. If you have watched my previous videos you will see how I’ve been working with this same young dog and I was using a lot of body english to get him to lay down and to get him to sit and now he is working mostly off of just voice commands. That is what I call a learning transition. All this takes is consistancy and patience along with a clear message when communicating with your dog.

If you train the way I do and you have a dog that’s about the same age then you are probabily at about the same level, or maybe even a bit further or just a bit behind, but you’re probably right in the ball park. This is a nice easy, non-stressful way to train your dog and it produces reliable, repeatable and consistant performance even around the most severe distractions.

I go through the behaviors at 10-20 repetitions at a time ending my day with 30 repetitions per behaviors per day. If you watch closely you might catch a few mistakes but that is bound to happen. You and your dog will recover. I leave the bloopers in there so you won’t feel like you are falling behind.

One thing to remember when you are working your dog is that the dog is going to follow the food so that’s why in this video you can see I’m down at mouth level because we are working on the “down” I’m going to make it easy for him to follow the food. This will encourage him to stay laying down.

Teach Your Puppy To Sit And Pay Attention

Teach Your Puppy To Sit And Pay Attention

In this video we are teaching out 14 week old labrador puppy to sit and look at his handler. I want this puppy to look me right in the face. When your dog is looking at you, then it isn’t looking at anything else. And that is perfection. I keep him really close and tight to the box. Since he is a young dog we only have so much time before he starts to poop out so squeeze in as many repetitions as you can.

You can see I am walking around him in a tight circle. That is for controlled distraction. As I walk in a circle I hold my hand with a treat in it right on his nose keep his nose up. Nose up = butt down.

You will see my just stand there and wait for him to look me in the face. When he does I will mark it with the word “Good” then pay the dog. In the beginning he will look at me by accident then after time he will understand looking at my face gets him paid. If you are having trouble getting started you can put a hotdog in your teeth so your dog can plainly see it, then when it looks at your face pay your dog. Another thing you can do is tuck a toy under your chin for the same idea.

Our puppy starts to get a little lost there for a bit so what I suggest is keep moving around the box so that it is between you and the dog at all times. If he wants to get close to me he must get on top of the box.

Thank you for watching and keep it fun and positive!–Ashley

Basic Obedience From The Beginning With A Puppy

 

 

Teaching A Puppy Basic Obedience From The Beginning

Today we are working basic obedience with this  six month old Golden Retriever puppy. You are seeing the first ever attempt at teaching this dog to lay down. You will notice that I do this a little differently than some other dog trainers you might have seen. I like this method because it helps keep the dogs fore legs steady throughout all the movements of the Sit, Down and Stand. It looks better and it’s more efficient. This way the dogs hips are tucked up undernieth when it lays down.

You can see this dog is really highly food motivated. She is right on the food hand.

The dog training video shows us working a drill where we do the behavior over and over. The magic number is 10,000 repetitions. 1,000 reps a month for 10 months. That’s 10,000 repetitions of every behavior you wish to teach. 

At 1:17 in the puppy training video I place my hand on the dogs back to help it stay down as I quickly move my food hand away from the dogs face and immediately return it. The lesson is the food will go away, and it will return. Over time the intervals will increase and the dog will learn to be steady and patient.

At 2:18 in the dog video I stand up and start to move around a tiny bit. This is another level of distraction. We are teaching the dog that I will eventually move around all over the place but you stay right there as I will be right back. We are desensithinsisng the dog to our movements. I start by just moving my feet around just a bit. the whole time still paying the dog with tiny pieces of hot dog.

Distractions can be measured in levels 1-10. Start at level 1 and every month as you get your 1,000 repetitions in you can level up another distraction level.

Not every bay area dog owner has the time for total complete basic obedience dog training and some of my clients’ time would be better spent working rather than training. That’s why we have introduced Day Training for your dog. We will pick up your dog and bring it to our 5,000 sq ft. location, train it, get the reps in and drop the dog off back to you.

How To Crate Train Your Older Puppy

How To Crate Train Your Older Puppy

This dog is a six month old female Golden Retriever doing some day training with us here at Canine Tutors. This is the first time we have introduced the crate to her and as you can see in the dog training video she is highly food motivated.

Notice how I have the crate and the dog aligned. The door to the crate is open and it is behind me so the dog cannot accidently slam the door shut. When the dog walks out of the crate you will see me re-align the dog so the crate is only six inches away, easily within eyesight.

I am going to use food to motivate and encourage her to go into the dog crate. You can see I am dropping the food into the crate through the bars. You can see she is a bit hesitant to go all the way into the crate but within just a few minutes she will walk all the way in. I want her to be confident that when she walks into the crate she won’t hear the door slam shut behind her. If we do that it would be hard to get her back in there.

As the puppy video progresses you can she just walks in there with more confidence. Walking all the way in is a learning transition. At about this time I will stop putting food in the crate and start to reward when she walks in and present the food when she turns to face me while still in the crate. At this point she can freely walk in and out of the crate. I still don’t shut the door at this point.

The reason I want her to like the crate is that as time goes on I am going to use the dog crate to teach her how to lay down, how to sit and a host of other dog training behaviors. I will also use the crate to manage an untrained puppy.

The second learning transition that you can see is the dog starts to stay in the crate and not rush out. So now what I am going to teach  her is that the longer she is in the crate, the more she gets paid. I would like yo to notice how in the beginning she really mugs my hands for the food then within a few minutes she stops. When that happens she is learning that her behavior gets her paid, not the guy holding the food.

Lastly, at the end of the puppy training video you can see that she comes halfway out of the crate, realizes that the money comes from her being in the crate and demonstrates another learning transition as she backs up in reverse to back into the crate. That was so good we had to stop right there for that training moment.

Teaching Your Puppy To Lay Down

Teaching Your Puppy To Lay Down

In the short puppy training video above you can see that I am teaching this 12 week old labrador retriever the “down”. Many of my dog training clients have very busy work and life schedules so I can do most of the training for them as long as they get the dog to me.

When I teach the down with such a young puppy like this I will start with the dog standing and use the “push” method. That is I hold the food in my hand and kind of gently push the food hand at the dogs nose and down at a slight angle. In order for the dog to get comfortable and get the food it has to push back and lower it’s body. If you keep your hand steady the nose and mouth will stay straight and the dog will down correctly.

Here is why you want to do it this way. Notice the front feet don’t move much if at all. What ever position you put the dog in you want those front feet to stay put. If you start teaching the down with your dog in the Sit position then the dog has no choice but to extend it’s front feet. If you do this enough times the dog will end up moving across the grass little by little as the front feet keep getting extended. By having the front feet stay put means having the dog stay put.

Lastly, by teaching your dog the Down in this fashion you will notice that the dog’s hips are tucked up under the dog as in a “ready” position. The dog is not looking lazy lying on it’s side. It looks like a pro. Alert and ready for quick action. From this proper position your dog can effortlessly raise it’s body to either a Sit or a Stand.

Introducing FREE Dog Sitting At Two Local Farmers Markets

My new dog kennel

My new dog kennel for the Sunnyvale and Campbell farmers markets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What you are looking at above is my new awesome dog kennel that I got for the Sunnyvale and Campbell farmers market. At the farmers market we love to see your dogs however those pesky people at the health department aren’t so thrilled. So we got together and came up with a great compromise. Bring your social dog to the Campbell or Sunnyvale farmers market but leave your little buddy in the brand new state of the art dog kennel. Best of all this service is FREE to the dog owner! Did I mention it was free?

We will provide shade and plenty of fresh water and a Canine Tutors certified dog attendant to watch over your little buddy. If you have a  really small dog we will have a separate space for him or her.

Do you love your local farmers market and all your vendors who work so hard to bring you all those fresh fruits and veggies every week? Well then hook them up and show them some love by leaving your dog with the pro’s at the free dog sitting kennel.

The Sunnyvale farmers market is open year ’round on Saturdays from 9am to 1 pm in the historic Murphy section of old downtown.

Historic Murphy Station

Historic Murphy Station

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coming Soon To A Kennel Near You…     

K9 Kennel Raised Flooring System

We at Canine Tutors Dog Training are excited to announce that starting in late spring of 2016 our kennels will be equipped with the K9 Kennel Raised Flooring System. This system is great for multiple dogs in a kennel. Since it is raised if a dog urinates in the kennel the liquid will run right through the flooring to the ground below. That means your dog will not be lying in another dog’s urine.

Having the flooring sit 1″ above the ground provides for better air circulation thus keeping your dog cooler and more comfortable than lying on the hot asphalt.

 

7 Tips To A Skinny Dog Part 2/3

Here We Go!!

Get that dog moving.

Dog exercise

The Fat Killer!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This the dog trotter. It is one of the best dog treadmills on the market. You should ask your dog trainer if he or she has one. The trotter, or other high end dog treadmills have a three point harness to keep your dog steady. The wheels have adjustable speeds that you hand tighten to increase or decrease resistance depending on your dog. Your dog doesn’t have to go on a full out sprint. No, just a little walk or a slight jog. In fact in the beginning I would suggest just a walk. The really cool feature about this is that once on the treadmill the wheels start to roll automatically. It is designed so that your dog’s toes will not get pinched.

Meet The Flirt Pole

private puppy classes san jose

Get that dog moving

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The flirt pole is essentially a stick with a tug type toy at the end attached by a rope. So if you have a dog that has a high prey drive, that likes to chase after things and tug things then this is for you guys. Just swing it around for a bit and occasionally let your dog score a hit and you guys are having some fun. This particular model is sturdy enough for this pitbull to grab it and get a good tug.

Super Insane Tug Toy!!

Super Insane Tug Toy

Super Insane Tug Toy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have a dog like mine then you have a dog that loves to play tug. Tug is a great game to play with your dog and you can use the tug as a reward for well done behaviors. In other words you can use it as a reward to help train your dog.

With this type of tug you won’t have to worry about sore shoulders any longer.

I like this design a bit better than the spring pole. With a spring pole the tug is hung from a tree and it launches the dog in the air by way of a pretty actively compressed spring.  You can get some crazy big air on the spring pole and it is a kick to watch your dog fly all bad ass through the air but… they can get hurt. On the spring pole your dog can get it’s teeth caught and some people freak out when they see their dog get launched 15′ in the air. The safe alternative (sorry danger lovers) is the super tug.

Make Crate Training Fun

Whether you want to crate train, potty train or house train your dog or puppy you will most likely need the help of a dog crate or kennel. Crates and kennels can make great management tools for dogs or pups that are still untrained in house manors. They serve as a good management tool as well as a tool for basic obedience training.

You can see in the video above that I have my dog going in and out of the crate–happy, That’s because I always associate it with high value food. Everyday I strap on the bait bag with cut up hotdogs and run her through this routine. I do the same with the larger kennel as well.

As you start out with this exercise first have your dog just jump in, then come right back out. Pretty soon you can count to 3 seconds before letting her out, then 5, then 10. On and on, longer and longer. When your dog is ready to stay in for several seconds start tossing tiny bits of food every other second or so, then gradually start to shut the door then open it right away.

Usually when I go through a training routine I will include the crate. When I bring it out my dog gets all excited.

If you just shove your dog in the crate and then leave for work your dog will hate it and that is how problems will start. I don’t believe dogs should be left alone or confined for hours on end and getting another dog does not make it better. Crates are not meant to be prisons, they are management tools. You can put your dog in a crate for maybe 2-3 hours a day tops. If you need more than that think about getting a dog walker or having your dog stay with a friend or someone who needs some company.

 

7 Tips To A Skinny Dog, Part 1

Fat dogs aren’t “loved” or cute. They will die faster and cost you thousands at the Vet and grocery. 

A few Sunday’s ago I was tending my free dog sitting booth at the Campbell’s farmers market when this man brought his dog for me to watch while he shopped for healthy food. The dog practacely rolled into my holding area. The dog was out of breath and they only walked a few feet from their car. Then I read an article in the New York Times about the emergence of high dollar fat camps for dogs.

Dog Fat Camp Article Here

Why do people think fat dogs are funny or cute?

According to the Association for pet obesity prevention over half the dogs in this country are overweight. You may think it’s cute to see your dog pittifully begging for table scraps getting fatter and fatter everyday, but are you going to think it’s funny when you have to shell out $2,500 for a new elbow? Oh and the vet usually suggest that you get them both done at the same time, $5,000, ouch!

Does this collar make my butt look fat?

Does this collar make my butt look fat?

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New York Times article goes on to say that overweight dogs are more likely to get Diabetes, Arthritis, high boold pressure, kidney and respiratory diseases.

You can reduce the calorie intake but exercise is needed as well to win the battle of the bulge. That is why I am a big fan of tred mills and exercising along side of a bicycle. Just please make sure you start out at a fast walk and work your dog safely. Here is my article on how to exercise your dog. 

Dog fat camps and personal trainers for dogs are a new tool to battle k9 calories. You will be looking at about $30 to $100 per session for your dog to hit the tred mill or some laps at the dog pool. You can also try some low cal dog food, although I wouldn’t waste your money on special food. The blame goes to you. Your dog eats what you give it and burns off the calories you allow. You must exercise the dog daily and I’m not talking about a walk. Taking your dog for a 30 min walk is like saying I did a pushup today.

 

Are we out of ice cream?

Are we out of ice cream?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 2 tomorrow

Your Dog Needs More Exercise, Dog Care

This two part dog care article is going to give you some suggestions on how to give your dog better care through exercise.

Just like us, your dog needs exercise and most dogs, certainly most bigger dogs don’t get enough of it. Most dogs in America are overweight and unhealthy. This can lead to a shorter life span for your dog as well as unnecessary vet visits and vet costs. Most Americans spend $500.00 extra per year just on over feeding their dog.

My personal favorite dog exercising tool is the bicycle, although not for dogs or puppies that are still growing and not for dogs that have bone, hip or joint problems.  I love to ride my beach cruiser with my girl dog running right next to me. She gets all excited when I get out the bike. If you are just starting out, start slow. This is for both you and the dog. If your dog has been sedentary for a while get it warmed up for a few weeks. You know don’t just start out all haul-ass. I would go for a fast walk pace and bring some water and a collapsable bowl with you. Remember start out real slow.

 

 

That's not what i meant

That’s not what I meant

This is a great attachment for the bike and a dog

This is a great attachment for the bike and a dog

 

 

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Canine Tutors
1633 Halbrook Dr.
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(408) 455-1503


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